DIY makeup tips for last minute costumes
Oct 30, 2013 | 2783 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Local makeup and costume designer for Patterson Repertory Theatre, Stefanie Baker Morriston utilized makeup, paints and closet items to produce three punk witches for Patterson Repertory Theatre's production of 'Macbeth.'----Photo by Shawn Overton
Local makeup and costume designer for Patterson Repertory Theatre, Stefanie Baker Morriston utilized makeup, paints and closet items to produce three punk witches for Patterson Repertory Theatre's production of 'Macbeth.'----Photo by Shawn Overton
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Baker applies flakes (opt for Oatmeal) to Jordan Bremer and dark under eye sockets that sink to his cheekbones for a zombie-like look.
Baker applies flakes (opt for Oatmeal) to Jordan Bremer and dark under eye sockets that sink to his cheekbones for a zombie-like look.
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Baker utilizes light and dark makeup palates to transform Craig Tyhurst into an old man.---Photo by Brooke Borba
Baker utilizes light and dark makeup palates to transform Craig Tyhurst into an old man.---Photo by Brooke Borba
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Murri Royal Brown utilizes dark makeup to accentuate the look of a dead tree in Patterson Repertory Theatre's production of 'Waiting for Godot.'----Photo by Brooke Borba
Murri Royal Brown utilizes dark makeup to accentuate the look of a dead tree in Patterson Repertory Theatre's production of 'Waiting for Godot.'----Photo by Brooke Borba
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Just like any other holiday, Halloween has a tendency to creep up on patrons and parents alike, forcing many to come up with less than desirable costume ideas. To be sure that you, or your children, are not out of the loop, local makeup and costume designer of Patterson Repertory Theatre Stefanie Baker Morriston has offered tips and tricks for last minute Halloween costumes that will be sure to inspire and compete against the most expensive of costumes.

Three makeup tricks to live by

Morriston, who has done extensive cosmetic work in her professional and personal career, believes there are three important tips to consider when devising a last minute solution. Instead of searching through your local stores for high priced costumes, or settling for something you didn’t intend to wear, revert back to the basics and take something from your own closet. The act will save time, effort and money, claims Morriston.

“A lot of people don’t realize this, but a costume can really come together just using makeup,” she said. “It isn’t expensive, and you can find it almost anywhere.”

1.“Don’t play by the rules”— Morriston claims that many makeup products can be used for multiple purposes, and that many products don’t need to be used as intended. According to Morriston, black or colored lipstick can be used as face paint, while blush may act as eye shadow. Inexpensive finds include Wet and Wild brands, which are rich with pigment, said Morriston, while ELF offers over 100 eye shadow within one palate for under $9. Target and Wal-Mart also sell tubes of black and white paint at dollar value.

2.“Use your resources”— As a theatre major at California State University, Stanislaus, and a cosmetic queen for Lancome, Bobbi Brown and Benefit, Morriston attests that looking to others for inspiration produces unique perspectives and widely popular designs. Youtube now offers thousands of tutorials for all types of makeup designs to enhance costumes. Masks are static and can sometimes be overpowering, but a cool brush effect may work wonders with your costume idea, while offering you a chance to eat and breathe comfortably.

“There are a lot of creative people in the world,” said Morriston. “The internet is saturated with creative materials, so don’t be afraid to borrow ideas from others.” You may just find a happy medium between your snarling werewolf and a smoky eye effect for a bewitchingly wolfish display.

3.“Don’t rush”— If you are new to the makeup game, Morriston suggests that you give yourself ample time to prepare. “If you rush, you tend to feel anxious,” she said. “I placed second (as a vampire) in a Halloween costume contest, and I only had 30 minutes to prepare. The first place winner was a $3,000 ghost-busters costume. I was only wearing black rags, but the makeup really sold it. I had veins coming out of my eyes— blood dripping is classic. Makeup is versatile; if you don’t feel comfortable, wash it off and try again. Give yourself time to experiment for what you want to look like.” You can’t always return a costume, but you can draw one up in a pinch.

Popular ideas on a dime

You are only limited by your imagination. Put those yellow sponges to good use as dinosaur scales or ridges for a stegosaurus; utilize old boxes to create robots, refrigerators and cars; use foil to make a tin-man outfit, or simply use ill-fitting clothes for zombie-like flair. Panty hose stuffed with paper or socks also make great tails.

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